The Stoic Society

Stoics aim to be free from anger, envy, and jealousy. To overcome your destructive emotions and teach you how to develop your self-control.

WHAT STOICS BELIEVE

The 4 Virtues of Stoicism

Wisdom

Courage

Justice

Temperance

Stoic Quotes

Robbers, perverts, killers, and tyrants —gather for your inspection their so-called pleasures!
MARCUS AURELIUS
MEDITATIONS, 6.34
Robbers, perverts, killers, and tyrants—gather for your inspection their so-called pleasures!
MARCUS AURELIUS, MEDITATIONS, 6.34
MARCUS AURELIUS
MEDITATIONS, 6.34
Remember to conduct yourself in life as if at a banquet. As something being passed around comes to you, reach out your hand and take a moderate helping. Does it pass you by...
EPICTETUS
ENCHIRIDION, 15
Remember to conduct yourself in life as if at a banquet. As something being passed around comes to you, reach out your hand and take a moderate helping. Does it pass you by? Don’t stop it. It hasn’t yet come? Don’t burn in desire for it, but wait until it arrives in front of you. Act this way with children, a spouse, toward position, with wealth—one day it will make you worthy of a banquet with the gods.
EPICTETUS, ENCHIRIDION, 15
EPICTETUS
ENCHIRIDION, 15
This is the true athlete —the person in rigorous training against false impressions. Remain firm, you who suffer, don’t be kidnapped by your impressions! The struggle is great, the task divine —...
EPICTETUS
DISCOURSES, 2.18.27–28
This is the true athlete—the person in rigorous training against false impressions. Remain firm, you who suffer, don’t be kidnapped by your impressions! The struggle is great, the task divine — to gain mastery, freedom, happiness, and tranquility. 
EPICTETUS, DISCOURSES, 2.18.27–28
EPICTETUS
DISCOURSES, 2.18.27–28
It is quite impossible to unite happiness with a yearning for what we don’t have. Happiness has all that it wants, and resembling the well-fed, there shouldn’t be hunger or thirst.
EPICTETUS
DISCOURSES, 3.24.17
It is quite impossible to unite happiness with a yearning for what we don’t have. Happiness has all that it wants, and resembling the well-fed, there shouldn’t be hunger or thirst. 
EPICTETUS, DISCOURSES, 3.24.17
EPICTETUS
DISCOURSES, 3.24.17
If someone asks you how to write your name, would you bark out each letter ? And if they get angry, would you then return the anger ? Wouldn’t you rather gently spell out...
MARCUS AURELIUS
MEDITATIONS, 6.26
If someone asks you how to write your name, would you bark out each letter? And if they get angry, would you then return the anger? Wouldn’t you rather gently spell out each letter for them? So then, remember in life that your duties are the sum of individual acts. Pay attention to each of these as you do your duty . . . just methodically complete your task. 
MARCUS AURELIUS, MEDITATIONS, 6.26
MARCUS AURELIUS
MEDITATIONS, 6.26
Clear your mind and get a hold on yourself and, as when awakened from sleep and realizing it was only a bad dream upsetting you, wake up and see that what’s there is just...
MARCUS AURELIUS
MEDITATIONS, 6.31
Clear your mind and get a hold on yourself and, as when awakened from sleep and realizing it was only a bad dream upsetting you, wake up and see that what’s there is just like those dreams
MARCUS AURELIUS, MEDITATIONS, 6.31
MARCUS AURELIUS
MEDITATIONS, 6.31
Whenever you get an impression of some pleasure, as with any impression, guard yourself from being carried away by it, let it await your action, give yourself a pause. After that...
EPICTETUS
ENCHIRIDION, 34
Whenever you get an impression of some pleasure, as with any impression, guard yourself from being carried away by it, let it await your action, give yourself a pause. After that, bring to mind both times, first when you have enjoyed the pleasure and later when you will regret it and hate yourself. Then compare to those the joy and satisfaction you’d feel for abstaining altogether. However, if a seemingly appropriate time arises to act on it, don’t be overcome by its comfort, pleasantness, and allure—but against all of this, how much better the consciousness of conquering it.  
EPICTETUS, ENCHIRIDION, 34
EPICTETUS
ENCHIRIDION, 34
Keep constant guard over your perceptions, for it is no small thing you are protecting, but your respect, trustworthiness and steadiness, peace of mind, freedom from pain and fear, in...
EPICTETUS
DISCOURSES, 4.3.6b–8
Keep constant guard over your perceptions, for it is no small thing you are protecting, but your respect, trustworthiness and steadiness, peace of mind, freedom from pain and fear, in a word your freedom. For what would you sell these things? 
EPICTETUS, DISCOURSES, 4.3.6b–8
EPICTETUS
DISCOURSES, 4.3.6b–8
Our soul is sometimes a king, and sometimes a tyrant. A king, by attending to what is honorable, protects the good health of the body in its care, and gives it...
SENECA
MORAL LETTERS, 114.24
Our soul is sometimes a king, and sometimes a tyrant. A king, by attending to what is honorable, protects the good health of the body in its care, and gives it no base or sordid command. But an uncontrolled, desire-fueled, over-indulged soul is turned from a king into that most feared and detested thing—a tyrant. 
SENECA, MORAL LETTERS, 114.24
SENECA
MORAL LETTERS, 114.24
There is no more stupefying thing than anger, nothing more bent on its own strength. If successful, none more arrogant, if foiled, none more insane —since it’s not driven back by...
SENECA
ON ANGER, 3.1.5
There is no more stupefying thing than anger, nothing more bent on its own strength. If successful, none more arrogant, if foiled, none more insane—since it’s not driven back by weariness even in defeat, when fortune removes its adversary, it turns its teeth on itself.
SENECA, ON ANGER, 3.1.5
SENECA
ON ANGER, 3.1.5

WHO WERE THE STOICS

The Stoic Philosophers

Marcus Aurelius

Stoic and Emperor

Seneca

Philosopher and Statesman

Epictetus

Slave to Stoic

Publius Rutilius Rufus

Posessed rare resolve

Thrasea Paetus

Stood anainst tyranny

Lucius Annaeus

Seneca the Younger

Diotimus

Made stuipd mistake

Junius Rusticus

Teacher and Politician

Porcia of Cato

Beauty and Personality

Cicero

Translateor of Greek Philosophy

Posidonius

Studied under Panaetius

Panaetius of Rhodes

Connected Philosophy with Culture
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 3

We ught to consider not only that our life is daily wasting away and a smaller part of it is left, but another thing also must be taken into the account, that if a man...
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 2

Begin the morning by saying to thyself, I shall meet with the busy-body, the ungrateful, arrogant, deceitful, envious, unsocial. All these things happen to them by...
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 1

From my grandfather Verus I learned good morals and the government of my temper. From the reputation and remembrance of my father, modesty and a manly character. From...
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 4

That which rules within, when it is according to nature, is so affected with respect to the events which happen, that it always easily adapts itself to that which is...
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 5

In he morning when thou risest unwillingly, let this thought be present- I am rising to the work of a human being. Why then am I dissatisfied if I am going to do the...
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 6

The substance of the universe is obedient and compliant; and the reason which governs it has in itself no cause for doing evil, for it has no malice, nor does it do...
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 7

What is badness? It is that which thou hast often seen. And on the occasion of everything which happens keep this in mind, that it is that which thou hast often seen....
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 8

This reflection also tends to the removal of the desire of empty fame, that it is no longer in thy power to have lived the whole of thy life, or at least thy life from...
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 9

He ho acts unjustly acts impiously. For since the universal nature has made rational animals for the sake of one another to help one another according to their deserts,...
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MEDITATIONS BOOK 10

Wilt thou, then, my soul, never be good and simple and one and naked, more manifest than the body which surrounds thee? Wilt thou never enjoy an affectionate and...